Would You Clone Your Pet?

This is part 1 in a 3 part series.

My love for dogs started early, as my grandparents and my parents bred Collies. Collie puppies were so much fun to play with!

Later on in high school, we had a large female Great Dane named Sabrina. She was my friend and protected me from my brother when we fought, which was fairly often, and she would take the wooden spoon from my mother if she tried any of her old school discipline on us!

Here is a picture of Sabrina I took my senior year in high school. It won a 2nd place prize in a Kodak sponsored photo contest!

Great Dane "Sabrina"

1976 photo captures Sabrina’s essence.

She was the best dog ever. But would I clone her? Would you clone a favorite pet? To answer these questions, and make an informed decision, let’s embark on a journey through the land of cloning and discover what cloning is all about.

Of course, it all started with Dolly. We’ve all probably heard of “Dolly,” the first mammal successfully cloned.

First cloned mammal.

1996 “Dolly”

Not long after, in 2004, a woman from Texas purchased the first commercial clone of a cat.

First commercial clone of a cat.

2004 “Little Nicky” is the first commercially cloned cat.

Little Nicky (born October 17, 2004). He was produced from the DNA of a 19-year-old Maine Coon cat named Nicky who died a year earlier. Little Nicky’s owner paid $50,000 to have Nicky cloned, which was performed by a California-based company that closed in 2006, Genetic Savings & Clone.

“Genetic Savings & Clone!” Are you kidding me?

Then, in 2005, this American woman received a cloned puppy created from her beloved late pitbull, becoming the inaugural customer of a South Korean company. She paid $50,000.00 which was half-price, being she was their first customer.

First cloned dog, Booger.

The company in South Korea claims to now clone 300 dogs/year. They also clone camels for customers in the Middle East. Hey, if you have a camel with larger than normal water reservoirs you might as well make copies! 🙁

$100k for clone of dog

2005 – South Korean scientists at Seoul National University performed the cloning procedure that produced Snuppy, the first successfully cloned dog

1st commercially Cloned Dogs

3-month-old Snuppy (right), is shown with the three-year-old Afghan hound whose skin cells were used to clone him.

Remember, however, all clones are not the same!

Cloned Dogs

A clone is not the same dog. In fact, thanks to a cloned dog having different mitochondrial DNA from its genetic donor, they’re slightly less related than naturally born identical twins.

Fast forward to December 2015. A British couple travel to South Korea to pick up two puppies born over Christmas, after having their dead pet cloned.

UK Family Clones Aging Boxer

Laura Jacques and Richard Remde are first British customers of Sooam Biotech Research Foundation.

Old Boxer Dog

It’s as if he knew.

What are some other reasons for cloning?
Follow this link for Part II – Cloning for Fun & Profit.

 

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