Is There a Downside to Cloning?

Part 3 of a 3 Part Series

In our journey so far, we’ve learned that it will cost over $100,000 dollars if we want to clone our beloved pet. We also now know  that an entire industry revolves around cloning farm animals for greater “yield” and it seems that there are plenty of folks out there cloning their prize cattle and horses for no other reason but save their children the “chore” of breeding.

What about  the downside? Is there one? Let’s continue our journey to find out. The Humane Society of the United States seems like a good place to start.


The Humane SocietyAccording to a study done by The Humane Society, cloning definitely has a downside. Here is a summary of their findings:

  • Because 99 percent of cloning attempts fail to produce a healthy cloned animal, thousands of embryos and hundreds of egg ‘donors’ and surrogate mothers are used in cloning ventures.
  • The egg ‘donors’ and/or surrogate mothers are subjected to painful hormone treatments to manipulate their reproductive cycles. These animals are also subjected to invasive surgery to harvest eggs or implant embryos, and the surrogate mothers endure an additional surgery to deliver the baby.
  • Few cloned animals are born healthy. One pet cloning company CEO has stated that 15-45 percent of cloned cats who are born alive will die within 30 days.
  • No cloned cat or dog has lived a full lifespan, so the health problems and veterinary needs they may experience later in life are completely unknown.
  • The “donor” and surrogate mother cats and dogs used in attempts to clone a pet are typically kept in small, sterile cages.
  • In the US, the pet cloning industry is not regulated like other research facilities that conduct experiments on animals.
  • Animal life is devalued.  Egg ‘donors’ and surrogate mothers are ‘production units,’ and it is unclear what happens to cloned animals who fail to meet expectations.

How long do you think this kitten lived?

It's not just the Humane Society who frowns upon cloning.

It’s not just the Humane Society who frowns upon cloning.

Compassion in World Farming was founded in 1967 in England by a British farmer who became horrified by the development of intensive factory farming.

Factory farming is the single biggest cause of animal cruelty. Compassion supporters have already improved the lives of millions of farm animals. But there is still so much more to do.

How many piglets were thrown away to produce this sounder of swine?

How many piglets were thrown away to produce this sounder of swine?

The name for a group of pigs depends on the animals’ ages. A group of young pigs is called a drift, drove or litter. Groups of older pigs are called a sounder of swine, a team or passel of hogs or a singular of boars.

These fellas don't look too happy. Do you think they might know they are clones?

These fellas don’t look too happy. Do you think they might know they are clones?

Many cloned farm animals are born with deformed organs and live short and miserable lives.

Cloned goat dies next to it's mother shortly after being born.

Cloned embryos tend to be large and can result in painful births that are often carried out by Caesarean section.z

Getting ready for the Cesarean that will deliver another cloned puppy into the world.

Getting ready for the Cesarean that will deliver another cloned puppy into the world.

Sooam Biotech was reported to have cloned 700 dogs by 2015 and to be producing 500 cloned embryos of various species a day in 2016!

Remember Booger? He was actually 1 of 5 cloned puppies.

Five little "Boogers" with one of their three surrogate mothers wait at the Korea National Airport to fly home to the USA.

Five little “Boogers” with one of their three surrogate mothers wait at the Korea National Airport to fly home to the USA.

It makes me sick thinking about the donor dogs and the surrogate mother dogs and what they have to endure. Not to mention the 100’s, 1,000’s of puppies that live horrible lives and die shortly after birth, to say nothing of the same for horses, cattle, and by now, an unheard of multitude of other animals.

Why is the cloning industry not regulated?

Dear friends, thank you for coming along on this journey with me. We have learned a lot, but most importantly we have an answer to our question: Would clone your pet? No!

Cherish the memories of your lost pet. An expensive copy is certainly not needed.

Cherish the memories of your lost pet. You do NOT need an expensive ill-begotten copy.

Would You Clone Your Pet?
Cloning for Fun & Profit
Is There a Downside to Cloning?

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